issues on the street paper BIG ISSUE

“Small Papers, Big Issues” | Author: Ann M. Brown | Date: June, 2002

걸인homeless들을 위해 일하는 선의의 대변자들은 거리잡지운동street paper movement을 시작했었다. 하지만 거리에서 살아남는 일이란 그들이 잡지를 파는 일 보다 훨씬 더 어렵다는 걸 증명하고 있다.

issues on the street paper BIG ISSUE 더보기

Andy Warhol

?
Andy Warhol, born as Andrew Warhola, was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, to a working class immigrant family of Ruthenian ethnicity from northeast Slovakia. He showed early artistic talent and studied commercial art at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh. In 1949 he moved to New York City and began a successful career in magazine illustration and advertising. He became well-known mainly for his whimsical ink drawings of shoes done in a loose, blotted style.

Andy Warhol 더보기

S Korea plans to withdraw one-third of troops from Iraq

[Captured Article] The Hindu News Update Service

Seoul, Nov. 18.(AP): South Korea plans to bring home about one-third of its troops from Iraq next year, the Defense Ministry said Friday.
Defense Minister Yoon Kwang-ung reported the plan to withdraw about 1,000 troops from Iraq to the ruling Uri Party on Friday, the ministry said. About 3,200 South Korean troops are stationed in northern Iraq to help rehabilitate the country, making Seoul the second-largest U.S. coalition partner contributing forces after Britain.

The announcement comes a day after South Korean President Roh Moo-hyun met U.S. President George W. Bush in the South Korean city of Gyeongju, where the leaders insisted their countries’ alliance was strong and agreed to work together to curb North Korea’s nuclear weapons ambitions.
South Korea’s move caught the White House by surprise. “They have not informed the United States government of that,” said National Security Council spokesman Frederick Jones.
Jones said Roh didn’t raise the subject of troop withdrawals with Bush when they met Thursday in Gyeongju.
“This issue was not raised,” Jones said. “Just the opposite.”
He said Bush expressed appreciation for the South Korean troops and Roh expressed pride in the accomplishments of the South Korean forces.

Timeline: French riots

[Captured Article in BBC Internet news]

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* The violence has spread far beyond the French capital

A chronology of key events:

25 October: Visiting the Paris suburb of Argenteuil to see how new measures against urban violence are working, Interior Minister Nicolas Sarkozy is pelted with stones and bottles. He says that crime-ridden neighbourhoods should be “cleaned with a power hose” and describes violent elements as “gangrene” and “rabble”.

27 October: Teenagers Zyed Benna and Bouna Traore are electrocuted after climbing into an electrical sub-station in the Paris suburb of Clichy-sous-Bois, in what locals say was an attempt to hide from police. The police deny this, but news of their deaths triggers riots in the area which is home to large African and Arab communities. Arsonists destroy 15 vehicles.

29 October: As unrest creeps across the Seine-Saint-Denis administrative region, a silent march to remember Zyed and Bouna is held in Clichy-sous-Bois by mourners in tee-shirts reading “dead for nothing”.

30 October: Mr Sarkozy pledges “zero tolerance” of rioting and sends police reinforcements to Clichy-sous-Bois. A junior minister in charge of equal opportunities, Azouz Begag, condemns the use of the word “rabble”. A tear gas grenade, like those used by riot police, explodes at a Clichy-sous-Bois mosque, provoking further anger.

1 November: Prime Minister Dominique de Villepin pledges a full investigation into the deaths of Zyed and Bouna at a meeting with their families. Rioting spreads out of Seine-Saint-Denis to three other regions in the Paris area.

2 November: Rioters ransack a police station at Aulnay-sous-Bois, police report coming under fire from at least two live bullets at La Courneuve and 177 vehicles are burnt.

3 November: Violence spreads beyond the Paris region to the eastern city of Dijon and parts of the south and west, with 400 vehicles burnt.

6 November: President Jacques Chirac promises to restore order after a meeting with his government. There follows the most dramatic night of rioting to date with nearly 1,500 vehicles burnt and nearly 400 arrests. Most attacks are now occurring far beyond the Paris area. Two policemen are seriously injured in clashes in town of Grigny, near Paris.

7 November: Jean-Jacques Le Chenadec, 61, dies of injuries he received in an assault on Friday in the town of Stains, Seine-Saint-Denis. French media suggest he is the first fatality of the riots.

Flatland Germany

This is Muinster, Germany. I just arrived here at the 17pm of yesterday. The size of city is smaller than buzzy Berlin, but the city has all of cosmopolitan interests in the centre near the Hauft Bhan Hof of Muinster, the main station.

Here? I can use the Internet in this place, Stadt Bibliotek Muinster meant public library in German language. Anyway I should pay for the library to use allowed Internet machines, but I can use an illigal way to use this with free of charge!! Firstly I get a system for searching books, and just click a banner on the corner. Amazon Dot DE! is the gateway to use internet, because through the German Amazon I can easly connect to American Amazon. The American!! Amazon has a web search engine.

All German towns where I’d visited were mostly in the centre of wide grounds. Somedays I got a lot of dropped apples on the road when I had spent too much money for the breakfast.

Tokyo Designersblock 문서들 모음

1968 Revolutions #

Oct. 7th thu. – 11th mon., 2004

Main Areas:
At galleries, boutiques, vacant land, in Aoyama, Shibuya, Harajuku, Daikanyama

1968 was the year that reflected the period of revolutions and turbulence.
Music transcended the time and design reflected the period. Political movements such as May revolution in Paris and Shinjuku riot in Tokyo left impact on people’s life.
The impact of this year grows to become the hope for people to be able to change the world by themselves.
But if we look back at those days, questions proposed at that time may remain unsolved.

The unsolved question sparked Nationalism and Globalization.
New waves of incidents happened: Short board surfing was born in Australian coasts.
Young people putting on jeans pants showing part of their hips were wandering on the streets.
The Beatles’ White Album created new phase of musical culture.
These changes were revolutions in 1968 that opened up people’s desire to answer the fundamental questions.
SURF REVOLUTIONS LIFE REVOLUTIONS

This year, 2004, has the similarity in terms of desire for changes.
It is now that we question the fundamental questions once again from universal views.
What was the question that was asked all around the world in those days?
What are the questions we are asking ourselves this year: What is the design? What is the space design? What are life and living?
DESIGN REVOLUTION

We once again question the cultures born in 1968.
We create new values regardless of concepts that have already been made.
Now, what truly changes the world is the design that possesses the essential of living.
We are convinced of the power of the design.

Producer of Tokyo Designers Block

Teruo Kurosaki

* 저자 / 출처 : http://www.tokyodesignersblock.com/2004/designer/

[edit]
tokyo designers block #

oct. 7 – 11, 2004
http://www.tokyodesignersblock.com/2004

most pictures by janine parker, some by mno design.

1968…

‘1968 was the year that reflected the period of revolutions and turbulence. music transcended the time and design reflected the period. political movements such as may revolution in paris and shinjuku riot in tokyo left impact on people’s life. the impact of this year grows to become the hope for people to be able to change the world by themselves. but if we look back at those days, questions proposed at that time may remain unsolved.

the unsolved question sparked nationalism and globalization. new waves of incidents happened: short board surfing was born in australian coasts. young people putting on jeans pants showing part of their hips were wandering on the streets. the beatles’ white album created new phase of musical culture. these changes were revolutions in 1968 that opened up people’s desire to answer the fundamental questions.

SURF REVOLUTIONS LIFE REVOLUTIONS

this year, 2004, has the similarity in terms of desire for changes. It is now that we question the fundamental questions once again
from universal views. what was the question that was asked all around the world in those days?

what are the questions we are asking ourselves this year: what is the design? what is the space design? what are life and living?
DESIGN REVOLUTION

we once again question the cultures born in 1968. we create new values regardless of concepts that have already been made. now, what truly changes the world is the design that possesses the essential of living. we are convinced of the power of the design.

text by teruo kurosaki


the producer of this five-day event ‘tokyo designers block is teruo kurosaki. he started an international empire of interior innovation through his idée and sputnik furniture lines. kurosaki wants now, via the staging of the fifth tokyo designers block, to exhibit the virtues of japanese design culture to the rest of the world. though not himself a designer, kurosaki has been called the ’terence conran of japan’ and become synonymous with a new wave of lifestyle design that is, first and foremost,
born out of tokyo’s peculiar urban milieu.

he studied physics and was supposed to be scientist or an engineer but decided that he wanted to work with interiors, architecture and the environment. in the 1980s, kurosaki opened a small interior design workshop in tokyo’s aoyama district and began making the acquaintance of the then still unknown designers philippe starck and marc newson. he exhibited his line ‘sputnik’ in the london designers block and could relate with those people, with their more edgy, alternative ways of showing design.

london designers block was the initial inspiration for the TDB. ”

* Author / Gathered from : http://www.designboom.com/snapshots/tdb04/1.html

[edit]
Tokyo Designers Block Registration Overview #

1968…..is the concept coined for Tokyo Designers Block 2004.
We are looking for participants to join us in creating designs that flow from the “happy chaos” which permeates the city of Tokyo.

Tokyo Designers Block Registration Overview

Date

Oct. 7th thu – 11th mon 2004

Period of Registration

June 1st tue – July 31st sat 2004
Individual entry
Corporate or group entry

June 1st tue – July 1st thu 2004
Sponsored entry

Conditions

Tokyo Designers Block is open to any and all designers, artists and creators, professionals and non-professionals.

*The entries, after being exhibited, are scheduled for publishment in a TDB official publication.
In this case the applicant does not receive any payment. The applicant is deemed in compliance with the above mentioned regulations, once the entry is submitted.

Details

There are three ways to participate in TDB.
Individual entry, Corporate or group entry, and sponsored entry.

1. Entry for individuals

This is for individual entry, but is not limited to a single product by an individual. The details are shown below.

The designer will automatically be eligible for the TDB Award and any other awards.
TDB committee will help in finding the exhibition spaces.
Designer will be introduced through the TDB official media outlets, (booklet and the website)
Blog(Weblog system) account will be distributed.
TDB tools will be distributed. (1 TDB flag / 1 official booklet / 1 name plate / invitation for official party / designers kit….)

2. Entry for Corporate or Group

This is for corporations or groups wishing to participate in TDB, exhibit their work, and jointly submit entries.

The designers will automatically be eligible for the TDB Award and any other awards.
TDB committee will help finding the exhibition spaces.
Designer will be introduced through the TDB official media, (booklet and the website)
Blog (Weblog system) account will be distributed.
TDB tools will be distributed. (1 TDB flag / 1 official booklet / 1 name plate / invitation for official party / designers kit….)
3. Sponsored entry

TDB will support individual designers and creators who present work that the TDB committee feels is new and unique. You may note your desire to be a sponsored entry when you submit your application.

Possible number of sponsored entry
10 designers (about)
Detail of sponsored entry
Designers will be exempt from entrance fee. TDB will assist in the exhibition of these works, logistics, and related PR work.
Registration Procedure
Please enter by registering for sponsored entry. After the entry is done, please fill in the application format and send it with other materials indicated by the TDB committee.
Deadline for the registration and submition
July 1st 2004
Announcement
July 15th (Will be posted on this website)
Things to submit
+ Entry sheet
+ Concept sheet of the exhibition
+ Portfolio (will not be sent back)

Entry Fee

for individual designer 105,000 JPY (tax included)
for corporate or group 525,000 JPY (tax included)

* Bank account and other details on the payment of entry fee will be sent to you as an invoice format after your registration is completed. (We will ask for the entry fee to be transferred to the appointed bank account)

Flow of Entry

Please register through this website.
To register, please click on the “To registration procedure” button and go to the page that reads, “TDB Terms & Conditions”. If you accept the terms and conditions, please follow with the registration procedure.
Deadline of registration: July 31st 2004
(Deadline of sponcered enry is July 1st)

After you have completed your registration, the invoice for the entry fee will be sent to you. It should be sent to you within about a week. Please transfer the entry fee to the appointed bank account.

Your registration will be fully completed after we confirm your payment. Then we will e-mail a password to you, and this is what you will need to access information about your exhibition and other such details.

Please register your exhibition details; such as exhibition location and the exhibition contents, through the website. What you input here, will be what is written about you in the booklet and the official website.
Deadline of registration: August 10th 2004

* 저자 / 출처 : http://www.tokyodesignersblock.com/2004/designer/en/tdb.do

[edit]
2003 #
[edit]
Tokyo Designers Block 2003 #

Tokyo, is an intriguing and interesting city.
Addresses certainly exist, but unlike Western countries where they are based on streets, numbers are appointed to areas making it difficult to find your destination at first glance. Funky cafes, and hip stores are hidden on the back streets, rather than main streets and avenues.
Inspired by Designers Block in London, I have tried to emanate the spirit in which designers collaborate and express themselves. What makes London Designers Block distinctive is that young designers rely very little on commercial enterprises and do not use conventional means of exhibiting their work. Instead they collaborate and rent old brick warehouses, creating a more individualistic and interesting approach to express themselves.

Reflecting on the landscape of Tokyo, we see a situation in which many different aesthetic tastes and expressions of design co-exist. Right before our eyes a new cultural appreciation is being born and is re-shaping our society. Designers use aesthetics as a weapon to cut through societal restrictions and conventions; to recreate and redesign society.

In this way the landscape of Tokyo is changing slowly, bit by bit, and this is what we desire and hope to achieve through TDB.

Producer of Tokyo Designers Block
Teruo Kurosaki

* 저자 / 출처 : http://www.tokyodesignersblock.com/2003/designer/

[edit]
TDB 2003 Competition #

In 1950, Edgar Kaufman Jr. wrote a book called, Introduction to Modern Design: What Is Modern Design & What Is Modern Interior Design, (published by MOMA Publications). He was a curator at the Museum of Modern Art in NY, and was the co-founder of the GOOD DESIGN? competition with Charles and Ray Eames, and Eero Saarinen. “Good Design” quickly became a coin word for product design that was both excellent and endurable. The revived awareness of “Good Design” in a contemporary landscape catapulted into a pursuit for products that were considered to be well-designed. This consciousness of design excellence was pivotal in paving the way for design today.

Now, 50 years later, more and more people have begun to doubt the concept of a solitary meaning of “good design”. Originally, the concept was an effective way to develop design based on function and aesthetic appeal. In the process of globalization and diversification of values among people in the modern world, however, defining one standard of design, that is considered to be ‘good’, proved to be a difficult task. Of course, what we have developed in the process and pursuit of good design cannot be denied, but the questions of how these standards are decided and judged must be re-addressed.

With the Tokyo Designers Block competition titled, “Bad Design in the Worst Spaces”, we are challenging this concept of ‘good design’ and suggesting a reevaluation in the way design is judged. This is by no means, a call for badly designed products, but more of a call for people to open their mind and let go of definitive standards of design excellence.

As I mentioned above, in accepting diversified values among people, good design has a direct correlation to when, where and by whom it is used, in order for it to be judged as good. If bad design is used in the ‘worst’ space, it could be a viable choice for the designer. In considering the product, what is considered the ‘best’ design is between the designer and user of the product, not an acceptance by general opinion.

For this competition, it is really important to consider the space and environment in which the product will be used, considering the specific user, not consensus of what type of design is considered to be ‘good’. We are really looking forward to designed furniture and interior products based on a more free way of thinking about design!

* 저자 / 출처 : http://www.tokyodesignersblock.com/2003/designer/en/competition.do

[edit]
2003 #
[edit]
Introduction of TDB 2002 #

lf you get in a taxi in Tokyo, tell the destination to the driver. Or, you can hardly get there. There is certain adress, but it’s just difficult or vacant understandable to reach the exact adress here. If you go to the back streets around Harajuku or Aoyama, you can walk around safely, and you will find some small trendy cafes, shops, galleries, and even pretty flower shops. There, it exists that some senses of the design. but, it’s not easy to tell you what it is.

We want to spot light and emphasize this approch to the beauty of the city. Tokyo Designers Block is not a design event nor a trade show of products designs. We are willing to make fun of design and try the best how design can do to the society in Tokyo city.

Dear my friends designers, let’s play with Tokyo City with us. Design has no Boundaries
Tokyo Designers Block Producer
Kurosaki Teruro

Event
Tokyo Designers Block 2001
Period
October 10th (Thu.) – 14th (Mon.), 2002

Areas
Aoyama
Harajuku
Shibuya
Daikanyama
Roppongi
Ebisu

Sponsor
Tokyo Designers Block Committee

* 저자 / 출처 : http://www.tokyodesignersblock.com/2002/about/index.php?page=about

Designersblock Milan 2004 Previews

Designersblock’s edgy experimentalism is always a magnet for international design newcomers. As they weave plans for their latest Milan show, Fiona Sibley caught up with Designersblock’s two visionaries, Piers Roberts and Rory Dodd (left), at work in their semi-derelict pub down the road…

FS: What’s your philosophy?
Piers Roberts: We just create an open platform to allow people to present their ideas. We don’t have a philosophy or an aesthetic.
Rory Dodd: We like brave people. We were trying to think of a name for the Scottish show we are taking to Milan and I was impressed by how brave they are to stay in Scotland and do things for themselves there.
Piers: Attitude is important. So is money – it is a commercial show.

Fiona: How do people get to be part of a Designersblock show?
Piers: We don’t canvas people much. It works through word of mouth.
Rory: It’s a nice and organic selection process. People come to us. They generally know why they want to do Designersblock and most we end up putting in our shows. We do chase some people if we like their stuff – that how it started with Sam & Dan and Norway Says. People like our London spaces – it’s either us or 100% Design. The difference between our exhibitors is greater and not so directly competitive.
Piers: We want people in our shows to communicate with each other. There’s an enormous loyalty around Designersblock and a huge loyalty from the audience. A lot of people choose us to launch but they also come back to do more things.
Rory: Yeah – Olav Kolti has done nearly all of them.

Fiona: As you’re active at both, do you participate in the Milan versus London debate?
Piers: There are different traditions. Milan’s is long and very fantastic.
Rory: You can’t knock Milan – 43 years and going strong.
Piers: You can say that Milan is suffering from the downturn in the German economy and increased competition from elsewhere. But it’s a more obvious career path. The British tradition has not been creatively a very encouraging environment. But you get energy and drive from that frustration and lack of opportunity and having to do things for yourself.
Rory: London definitely has the capacity and the competency to justify the hype. But the industry needs more weight behind it. The London Design Festival is a brilliant start. We are totally convinced that if you put good design in front of the public they respond well to it. We used to get away with murder with the things we sold in our ?Brick Lane shop. People would buy the strangest things because they were good – and they understood it.
Piers: There are lots of cities across the world that want to stage big creative weeks now. Milan is like Cannes – it’s traditionally where the concepts are coming from.
Rory: Also the debate is far more sophisticated there. Milan’s design press is unrivalled and people think about things in a much better way. It’s the best place to make an impact. If you’re bold in Milan you are going to get noticed, particularly now as less money is being spent by the companies who used to put on lavish presentations. It’s probably still the best window to be seen through.
Piers: The important thing is that we understand the mindset of the people doing the shows themselves – we are very typical of a developing creative business, fighting against the same problems. That’s why are shows are linked to advice and training. We offer a shoulder in a real environment. We have analysed how creative businesses develop and came up with Risk It so that we are in a position to advise people.

Fiona: What excites you both at the moment?
Rory: Not London – that’s exciting. The whole area around the north-west of England – Liverpool, Manchester – is growing.
Piers: Preston in particular really gets what we are talking about with Risk It, our model for understanding how creative businesses develop. They have only just become a city and the regeneration initiatives are really well devised. We are looking forward to working more with them.
Rory: I’m really exciting about taking the Scottish show of 10 people to Milan. We want more people with an ambition to do things themselves. We’ve ordered our kilts.

Designersblock Milan 2004 is at Via Friuli, South East Milan. Nearest station: Lodi from April 13-19. The party – April 15.

www.designersblock.org.uk

February 2004

* 저자 / 출처 : ?HiddenArt http://www.hiddenart.com/news/interviews/designersblock